Experience with an iPhone 5

Well someone was selling an iPhone 5 cheaply, so why not, and with an unlimited 4G data plan from Three, so thought it would be a time for an experiment.

First thing that got on my tits was the screen size. After using a Nexus 5 since it’s release, it was a strange experience to go back to a smaller screen especially when it came to the poxy keyboard on the iPhone. Swiftkey was the first app to be installed.

But on the whole, the iPhone 5 is quicker at loading apps and with Chrome installed instead of that crap called Safari, I’m liking the experience and maybe if it was an iPhone 6 I would get on with it better, but I think I’ll be upgrading to the new Nexus 5 when that is released later this year rather than the expense of a iPhone 6. It’ll make a good work phone as no one other than PPI salespeople seem to know the outside phone number of the web team’s desk phone!

But you know the best thing about an iPhone?

1437993706_thumb.png IMG_0018

Fuck yes 🙂

The Clangers phone sounds

I have too much spare time on my hands, so one night when the wife buggered off to sleep, I went through some episodes of the new Clangers and grabbed some audio for some phone notifications.

After literally a few seconds work in Audacity I had enough to drive people around me mad, and since I’m a sharing kind of person, here they are for download. Sure I’m breaking copyright regulations, but we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.





MacOS media keys stopped working

The Play/Pause media key in iTunes stopped working recently, and while ploughing through pages and pages of answers, I suddenly remembered the last experience of when the Next and Previous media keys stopped working.

That solution involved killing off the Google Music extension in Google Chrome as it hijacked the keys, so it couldn’t have been that screwing up my Play/Pause button.

So just for shits and giggles, I went to chrome://extensions and scrolled down to Keyboard Shortcuts at the bottom, and what do you know, Black Menu for Google was hijacking the Play button.

Click on the dropdown where it says Global to In Chrome and hey presto, I don’t have to click to iTunes to pause music anymore.


Sharia Law in the UK

I see this is doing the rounds on Facebook again.



Which Sharia Laws are you speaking of? Oh, you mean you can’t think of any? That might be because, and let’s be clear about this, THERE ISN’T ANY FUCKING SHARIA LAW IN THE UK! It’s not recognised in the UK. It’s not recognised under UK law. There are no Sharia exceptions in UK law.

The Islamic Sharia Council, which has 100 or so courts in the UK, act overwhelming on marriage issues in Muslim communities, wish are NOT legally binding. You’re upset over that? Well maybe you should be upset about similar Jewish courts that have been operating for much longer.  No ssshhhhh be quiet, they aren’t muzzies so they’re ok.

Maybe you mean the Muslim Arbitration Tribunals, whose decisions are legally binding? Now, that’s bollocks as well. ANY arbitration where the parties agree is legally binding, see the Arbitration Act 1996.

So, you knuckle dragging, Daily Mail reading, UKIP cunts… where is this Sharia Law that you are so terrified of?

Fundamentally Flawed: End of Year Special 2014

Blame it on a bizarre alignment of the planets, or Nibiru, or just plain boredom, but on December 30th 2014 Fundamentally Flawed reunited for a one-off* podcast special.

With Alex, Kat, my good self, Peter and later on a pissed up Jim, we discuss some of the events of 2014 (thanks to Wikipedia’s exhaustive list of events and deaths)

WARNING! This contains video of me and my comedy accent.

* probably not.

Sorry, but Sarcastic People are Actually Smarter Than You Are

Sarcasm, as they say, is the ability to insult stupid people without them realizing it.

In some cases, sarcasm is a means of indirectly expressing aggression toward others or insecurity about oneself, as Psychology Today puts it. In other cases, it’s more of a secret shield from all the moronic buffoons in the world – a sort of a “true lie” that listeners won’t always comprehend as being insincere.

It’s a private joke that can save you from annoying and aggravating situations, providing a respite in humor even in the crappiest situations.

So are sarcastic people just certified smart asses, or are we more intelligent (at least on an emotional level) than non-sarcastic people?

An university investigation shows that the ability to understand sarcasm depends on a carefully orchestrated sequence of complex cognitive skills in specific parts of the brain.Dr Shamay-Tsoory, a psychologist at the Rambam Medical Centre in Haifa and the University of Haifa, said: “Sarcasm is related to our ability to understand other people’s mental state. It’s not just a linguistic form, it’s also related to social cognition.”

Her research revealed that areas of the brain that decipher sarcasm and irony also process language, recognize emotions and help us understand social cues.

Dr Shamay-Tsoory further explained that “understanding other people’s state of mind and emotions is related to our ability to understand sarcasm.”

Sarcasm seems to exercise the brain more than sincere statements do. Scientists who have monitored the electrical activity of the brains of test subjects exposed to sarcastic statements have found that brains have to work harder to understand sarcasm.There is actually a three-stage neural pathway in our brains that enables us to understand irony.

First the language center in the brain’s left hemisphere interprets the literal meaning of words. Next, the frontal lobes and right hemisphere process the speaker’s intention and check for contradictions between the literal meaning and the social and emotional context. Finally, the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex – our sarcasm meter – makes a decision based on our social and emotional knowledge of the situation.

According to Smithsonian magazine, a study in Israel has college students listen to complaints on a cellphone company’s customer service line.The students were better able to solve problems creatively when the complaints were sarcastic as opposed to just plain angry. According to the study’s authors, sarcasm “appears to stimulate complex thinking and to attenuate the otherwise negative effects of anger.”

So the students who recognized sarcasm had a better developed “theory of mind” – an ability to see beyond the literal meaning of the words, and understand that the speaker may be referring to something entirely different.For example, a theory of mind allows you to realize that when your girlfriend says “nice pants” when you have a giant hole in your crotch,she means just the opposite, that bitch.

As Richard Chin of Smithsonian Magazine explains, sarcasm requires a series of “mental gymnastics.” Sarcastic, satirical or ironic statements all compel the brain to “think beyond the literal meaning of the words and understand that the speaker may be thinking of something entirely different.”Studies have shown that exposure to sarcasm enhances creative problem solving. Thus, over time, this increased bulk of cognitive-expenditure doesn’t go to waste. Chin describes active sarcasm use as a means of “mental exercise.” Just like training your muscles, if you do 50 push-ups a day, over time, your arms are bound to be toned. So sarcasm, as a form of “mental exercise,” or “mental gymnastics” functions the same way. Over time, that “extra work” brought forth by sarcasm leaves our brains toned, too.

Some language experts suggest sarcasm is used as a sort of gentler insult, a way to tone down criticism with indirectness and humor. Other researchers have found that the mocking, smug, superior nature of sarcasm is perceived as more hurtful than a plain-spoken criticism; in fact, the Greek root for sarcasm, sarkazein, means to tear flesh like dogs.

But that all depends on who you’re talking to. Without sarcasm, what other shield do we have from stupid people?

Original article taken from PuckerMob.